Driving out of the city last weekend, we heard “Stay Schemin’” four or five times before losing local rap radio. The song sort of plods in that setting because it’s long and the censoring robs the lyrical delivery of any gravitas while creating a lot of blank space in the hook. By the time the third verse comes around — the one by French Montana, who also sings the chorus — it feels like it’s been forever, but there’s one more special nugget, at around the 3:35 mark, in a couplet that references Jim Jarmusch.
Montana begins, “From the hoopty coupe to that Ghost, dog/ Pigeons on the roof like Ghost Dog,” but because of the way the snare hits fall, paired with his regional accent and enunciation, it sounds like he says, according to many on the internet, “Fanute the coupe…" He doesn’t — too few syllables — but the word (while not yet on Urban Dictionary) is taking on a life of its own, and has since been defined as to “get money,” or more generally, to do away with or swap. But that’s subject to change. I’ve been checking the term using Twitter’s search function for a few weeks now, and I keep waiting for Complex.com to write an explainer, but it hasn’t arrived yet.
Misheard lyrics might’ve once been an intimate experience resulting in a brief embarrassment among a small group (“one-winged dove,” for me) but now we’re sharing, giggling publicly, and innovating. French Montana could use another catchphrase.

Driving out of the city last weekend, we heard “Stay Schemin’” four or five times before losing local rap radio. The song sort of plods in that setting because it’s long and the censoring robs the lyrical delivery of any gravitas while creating a lot of blank space in the hook. By the time the third verse comes around — the one by French Montana, who also sings the chorus — it feels like it’s been forever, but there’s one more special nugget, at around the 3:35 mark, in a couplet that references Jim Jarmusch.

Montana begins, “From the hoopty coupe to that Ghost, dog/ Pigeons on the roof like Ghost Dog,” but because of the way the snare hits fall, paired with his regional accent and enunciation, it sounds like he says, according to many on the internet, “Fanute the coupe…" He doesn’t — too few syllables — but the word (while not yet on Urban Dictionary) is taking on a life of its own, and has since been defined as to “get money,” or more generally, to do away with or swap. But that’s subject to change. I’ve been checking the term using Twitter’s search function for a few weeks now, and I keep waiting for Complex.com to write an explainer, but it hasn’t arrived yet.

Misheard lyrics might’ve once been an intimate experience resulting in a brief embarrassment among a small group (“one-winged dove,” for me) but now we’re sharing, giggling publicly, and innovating. French Montana could use another catchphrase.

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